By Mark Yanai

Strategic Planning for 2017

Print

On April 6-7th, a two-day course was hosted at the Ko’olau Conference Center by Donna Ching, Ph.D. for Strategic Planning and Facilitation. Donna is the founder of the Pacific Center for Collaboration and has held workshops for the past few years after “retiring” from the faculty of the College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources at the University of Hawaii, Manoa.

I attended the course accompanied by Art Lum, co-owner of F&L, in hopes that we could learn new skills and a process in guiding our organization. There were 28 other attendees from different backgrounds including state, research and educational organizations. What we all had in common was a passion to provide for others so that we could create a work environment of safety and collaboration.

20170407_091520_HDR

The workshop was outstanding in all aspects. Donna’s passion of teaching collaboration techniques, Appreciative Inquiry, and her unique process model for planning made for an energetic workshop that encouraged participation and learning through experiences. I was often moved by the experiences shared by the other attendees and saw how the skill of sharing our lives through storytelling is a key component of her model. The world is changing and the process model that she teaches is necessary for the leadership of any organization hoping to thrive in it.

At the heart of her process model is Appreciative Inquiry (AI).  According to the Center for Appreciative Inquiry, “AI is a way of being and seeing. It is both a worldview and a process for facilitating positive change in human systems, e.g., organizations, groups, and communities. Its assumption is simple: Every human system has something that works right–things that give it life when it is vital, effective, and successful. AI begins by identifying this positive core and connecting to it in ways the heighten energy, sharpen vision, and inspire action for change.”

[one_half]

20170407_122617_HDR          20170407_164158_HDR[/one_half]

[one_half_last]

This process of “facilitating positive change” is in alignment with F&L’s values-based organization and is what our company has implemented in creating our policies and procedures. We plan to use what we know about AI and what we’ve gained from the strategic planning course to guide us into becoming a world-class organization.

Besides the actual course presentation, I was very impressed by Ko’olau’s Ballroom and Conference Center. The room was located in Honey’s restaurant and the food was outstanding. The room was perfect for the size of the group and there was lots of free parking. The location is close to our Windward offices and is the perfect setting with the Ko’olau mountain range as a backdrop.

I look forward to taking more workshops from Donna and hope to take her Facilitation Skills class in the later part of the year. If you are a leader of your organization, I would highly recommend taking one of her workshops.[/one_half_last]

 

 

By Deb Matsuura

My Co-op Experience in Hawaii – Ashley

Guest Blogger: Ashley – Former Co-op student from Northeastern University

[one_half]My months in Hawaii were some of the best months of my life. While there I was able to meet extraordinary people, try things I’ve always wanted to, and learn so much. Working at Fukuji and Lum in particular was life changing. The co-workers and patients, and even my fellow co-ops, are all amazing people, and I am a better person for having met them.

My experience working at the front office showed me how to be patient (it’s a pun, get it?) and showed me another side of the job, however, working one on one with patients was the best part. I loved getting to know all of the patients and their stories.

[/one_half]

[one_half_last]

ash blog3

[/one_half_last]

It was about more than just getting them better, I was able to form bonds with each and every one of them. I worked with all sorts of populations from geriatric, to work injuries, to post stroke patients. The variety of people I got to meet was incredible and taught me so much. I got really close to some patients and I didn’t know the bonds that I could have with some of these people, which made leaving so hard. From having a patient cook me Portuguese bean soup, to hearing all about someone’s strife and triumph, I am a better person for having met each and everyone one of them.

[one_half]

ash blog4

[/one_half]

[one_half_last]

Working at Fukuji and Lum was like no other job I ever had. Never had I experienced such love and respect from co-workers. I feel as though I got to know every single person, from the pool to the WORC and LA clinics. My co-workers were one of the best parts of my experience. Who else’s bosses would take them a half mile into the clouds at 2 in the morning? Being invited over for holidays to the island Hyland’s house really showed me the kind of people I now had in my life and I am forever grateful for that. Jocelyn even cooked animal carcass because she loves us so much! It was like having a home away from home. Even now I still get texts and surprise packages with Hawaiian goodies from Rachel, wondering how I am doing or just because she is so thoughtful. [/one_half_last]

Janie was like my Hawaiian mom who always knew how to make me laugh and always had something cool to show me about PT. Janie, if you’re reading this thanks for the massage by the way, it was the best hour of my life. The love and care Jocelyn, Rachel, Jaime, Janie, Jesse, Tasha, Mark, Stephanie and Nicole (to name a few!) gave to their patients every day at work showed me what patient care was supposed to be like, and I strive to use what I learned here every day. I miss seeing their smiling faces and all the laughs they brought me.

Another one of my favorite parts about Hawaii was the island itself. I love beaches and weather above 30 degrees, so when I saw Hawaii as an option for my co-op I was ecstatic, and knew right away this was a once in a lifetime experience that I didn’t want to miss out on. Having my three amigos with me made the experience even better. I have no idea how I would have found not one, but two beaters, learned to hula dance(ish), find our missing dog a million times, or possibly have so much fun at Costco, without them. There aren’t three other people I rather have been with except maybe Jesus, my grandma, and John Lennon, if were playing that game.

It was heartbreaking to leave paradise: the ocean, the palm trees, the sting of Kailua’s fine sand pelting you in the face as you tried to soak up the sun, but it was even harder to leave all the incredible people that changed my life. That certainly wasn’t the last time I’ll be in Hawaii so for now I’ll say, A Hui Ho!

 

By Deb Matsuura

Aloha Tim!

Last, but not least, we would like to introduce Tim, our final Co-op for this spring semester.

Aloha! I have the awesome opportunity of being one of the five Northeastern Co-ops making Fukuji and Lum home for the next six months. Here is a little about myself and how I got here. Instead of doing Northeastern’s six year PT program, I joined at their half way point after completing my undergrad at the University of New England earning my degree in Applied Exercise Science.

I first learned about Fukuji and Lum when Mark came to talk to the PT students in Boston. His talk about being part of the F&L Ohana is what drew me to this site and showed its character. A couple of months later I find myself fortunate enough to start my journey here.

                   tim2           tim

I was lucky enough to have parents that love traveling and have instilled that drive in me. They showed me the importance of learning about new cultures in order to understand and respect everyone’s way of life. Hawaii is no different and has shown to be full of rich history and traditions.

I am learning food is a huge part of Hawaiian life and that is something we have in common! Luckily I have not had anything too challenging cross my plate yet on my trip. To facilitate my exploring I do rely heavily on recommendations: hurricane popcorn and poke are quickly turning into some all time favorites. So far I have been told poi and lau lau are some of the things I need to try before I leave. Most surprising for me was how good shaved ice tasted, which tasted much more flavorful than I had expected.

Some things I would like to do while I am here are learn how to surf and learn how to play the ukulele (I already started the latter). The list of hikes, viewpoints and places to visit literally goes on for pages and is far too long for this post. More in a few weeks!  IMG_2155

Guest Blogger: Tim L.