By Mark Yanai

Introducing Colby

Every six months I interview and hire new Co-op students from Northeastern University to work with our organization as physical therapy students. From their first Skype interview to their last day in clinic, I feel the need to take care of these kids, making sure they are learning about the PT profession and experiencing life here in Hawaii. I always feel a sense of closeness to them and often wonder what it is that draws me so much to these students.

Last week I dropped my son off to college at the University of Washington for his freshman year. The feelings I had as a dad seeing my son leave home and off to a new school was of both elation and sadness. I felt so proud of him that he was taking on a new adventure and yet I was sad that from now on, I wouldn’t get to be a part of it, as I have been. I hope that the new people who become a part of this new chapter will take care of him.

And with those thoughts I realized what draws me so deeply to our Co-op students. While they are not my sons or daughters, the F&L family treats them as such. I feel like a parent watching them grow as students and prosper as employees, while guiding them along the way. I am grateful to be a part of their short stay with us and am happy to say that I had a hand in their learning process so they are able to get the most of out of their experience, whether it be in or outside of the clinical setting.

With that, I am happy to introduce our new student Co-ops this fall semester, starting with Colby.
[one_half]
In a haiku, what school did you attend in high school and what’s your current college?

First, Lynnfield High School.

Next, I go to Northeastern

Which is in Boston. [/one_half]

[one_half_last]

co-op-blog-2

[/one_half_last]

What drew you to PT?
I originally was in school for Mechanical Engineering (at Northeastern University); but after shadowing some engineers the summer before my freshman year of college, I realized I didn’t see myself as an engineer in 20 years.  My mom and dad have been in and out of Physical Therapy for as long as I can remember.  Seeing their progress through and through has inspired me to become a part of this field that can positively affect a patient’s life.

Why did you want to do your coop in Hawaii?
I grew up in a small town right outside of Boston.  If I didn’t experience living in another state outside of New England then I would be doomed to live there for the rest of my life.  Hawaii is a great opportunity to see and learn about a whole new culture.  Now that I’m here I can’t wait to move back.

What is the strangest thing you have eaten since arriving?
Lychee Seeds brah, dey broke da mout’!

 co-op-blog-4         co-op-blog-1

What are your outside interests?

I really enjoy hiking, body surfing, being at the beach, photography, pick-up games of basketball, football and soccer, and playing music.  I’m also involved with the musical theatre company back at school.

What is on your to do list while here?
See the other islands.  Try as many foods as I can.  Take lots of pictures.  Get better at surfing.  Take a Hula Class.  Honestly, the list keeps getting longer every week just by talking to the patients and coworkers.

[one_half]

What is your spirit animal?
The majestic sea cucumber.

What kind of therapist do you hope to be?
I hope that I can be a therapist that not only provides care and therapy to the patient.   But can be a friend if they need it.  I want to foster a relationship with my patients and coworkers that makes choosing to go to work in the morning a very easy decision.  As far as what setting I’d like to work in… honestly I have no idea yet; I would love to have a chance to work at as many different settings as I can.

[/one_half]

[one_half_last]

co-op-blog-3

[/one_half_last]

Who is your greatest influence in your life?
I have many influences in my life, all equally important to me.  I can’t say one is greater than the rest because I wouldn’t be where I am today without all of them.  An important influence has been my parents though.  Being able to go home one day and fix them would be one of the most rewarding experiences.  Another influence is seeing a patient’s path to recovery from start to finish.  I’m glad and hope that I will always be able to relish and share the joy of getting a patient back to their “old selves”.  

 

By Mark Yanai

Meet Jocelyn

Pediatrics and Pool Time with Jocelyn

[one_third]

[fancy_images width=”150″ height=”150″]

[image title=”Jocelyn Shiro, P.T., PAq” caption=”Jocelyn Shiro, P.T., PAq”]https://fukujilumpt.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/jocelyn-webpic.jpg[/image]
[/fancy_images]

[/one_third] [two_third_last]

Jocelyn Shiro, MSPT, PAq has been a licensed and practicing physical therapist for the past 30 years in California, Alaska, and Hawaii. Twenty­-eight of those years have been in pediatric rehab, working with clients of various ages, ranging from birth to young adulthood. She has worked in neuro-rehabilitation, public schools, birth to three early intervention and private pediatric clinic settings.

[/two_third_last]

Jocelyn has experience with aquatic physical therapy, developmental assessments, sensory integration treatment, evaluation and treatment of children with global and motor developmental delays, Down Syndrome, Cerebral Palsy, Muscular Dystrophy, Autism and Autism Spectrum Disorder, Traumatic Brain Injury, Stroke, Spina Bifida, lower extremity amputation from disease, trauma, and birth defects, Failure to Thrive, FAS, seizure disorders, Brittle Bone Disease, and orthopedic anomalies.

In August 2016, Jocelyn became a certified Pediatric Aquaticist through the Aquatic Therapy University in Minneapolis. She currently works for Fukuji and Lum as a full time aquatic physical therapist, and for the Waianae Coast Early Childhood Services Parent Child Development Center.

ped2 ped1

Jocelyn joined us a year ago and has been busy at our Kokokahi location working daily in the pool. Her certification in Pediatric Aquatics brings us closer to providing lifelong care for our patients.

What makes you so drawn to working in pediatrics?
I have always had a soft spot for babies and children.  No matter what deficit or diagnosis they have, no matter how high or low functioning they are, they just want to have fun and feel happy.  If they are in pain or are unhappy, hugs tend to work much better than pills. They are also smaller than me, and being a rather small adult, it makes being a physical therapist much easier!

Who is your greatest influence in physical therapy?
My clients, both young and old are my greatest influences.  I am often inspired by those who are overcoming pain, suffering and disability, and I strive to be a better therapist, so that I can better help them.

What is the most interesting thing or most rewarding thing in working with children?
Children’s bodies and nervous systems tend to be more plastic or resilient, because they are young and still developing.  They tend to improve or recover relatively quickly, which makes working with them very rewarding.  I also enjoy working with parents or other caregivers, educating them and empowering them to be their child’s best advocate and “therapist”.

[one_half]

You moved from Alaska to work in Hawaii. What drew you to Hawaii? 
I was tired of the cold, dark winters of Alaska and was ready for a change. I felt like I had made an impact and contribution to my small town in Alaska through teaching dance and being a PT for the hospital, public schools, and the birth to three early intervention organization.  I wanted try making a new contribution to a new community, with the same feeling of “Ohana” if I could.

[/one_half]

[one_half_last]photo [/one_half_last]

[one_third]

joc-rach

[/one_third]

[two_third_last]

What do you see in F&L that’s so different than other PT organizations?
The owners and clinic directors treat, make investments in, and take care of their employees like family.  I am starting to really feel a part of it just after a year. I’ve worked many years in different settings, and it’s rare to find that special closeness between the different staff levels.  Everyone is important and valued, regardless of title. When people feel invested like that, the company can run more smoothly and respectfully. I truly appreciate that and feel blessed to be a part of Fukuji and Lum Ohana.

[/two_third_last]

How have you adapted to life on the islands?
Haha, I think I have adapted very quickly and comfortably.  I feel very at home here and have enjoyed getting to know a wide variety of people, both local and not local, and have involved myself in the medical, yoga, and dance communities this past year.  And my son serendipitously ended up at the University of Hawai’i Manoa, which we both love (that was NOT planned, but he says I followed him).

[/one_half_last]

 

By Mark Yanai

The Awesome Experience of Finding Yourself

image1

One of the rewards of working with physical therapy students is being able to witness their amazing growth during their time with us. At the end of their internship, students normally see the success they accomplished with their work and have the realization of a learned skill. But with the Northeastern Co-Op students, it’s often a lot more than what happens in the clinical setting. They end up discovering their identity of who they really are and want to be in life.

While the experience of being in Hawaii for six months seems like an extended vacation, it is often much more than that. There’s a saying “You never leave a place you love, you take a part of it with you, leaving a part of you behind.” I find this is true for many of the Co-Ops, but much more so with Kara, one of our 5 Co-ops this past semester. When I first posted a blog introducing her back in Febuary, she wrote about her hopes to finding out what kind of therapist she could be. Six months went by fast and I could describe her tremendous growth in my words, but it’s more clear when you hear it from her.

My Co-Op Experience: Kara

So I guess now that I’m done with my first semester back I have no more excuses to not write this blog. It’s a big undertaking, however, because I am not particularly adept at putting my feelings and experiences into coherent thoughts. My usual encounter with anyone asking me how my 6-month co-op was in Hawaii might be something like this:

“So how was Hawaii?” Internal dialogue: ‘Ohmygosh it was so great I had so much fun I learned so much Fukuji and Lum is awesome they actually care so much about the co-ops and that we are having a good/educational time and the islands were great/magical/more than I ever imagined and I made friends and swam in the ocean with cute sea creatures and almost fell off a few mountains and ohmygosh I got so fit biking to work every day but it was scary in the rain and everyone was always so concerned and supportive of everything that we did and looked out for us like family wait what was I saying? What I actually say: “uhhhh…. Awesome?!?!”

image2

[one_half]

I’m pretty sure no one wants to hear me babble on like that, but that’s pretty much still all I can do.  I cannot describe what a great experience working for Fukuji & Lum was, or how much all of my amazing coworkers mean to me. It wasn’t just 6 months of sun and fun in a tropical paradise, although there was plenty of that, I was welcomed into the F&L family as a long-lost relative. The Hawaiian concept of Ohana is now engrained in me, not by being told the definition over and over, but by being shown over and over in the kindness and love of everyone I encountered.

[/one_half]

[one_half_last]

image5

[/one_half_last]

The experience I gained in the different clinics will shape the type of therapist I become. Up till now, being a physical therapist was a VERY distant dream. Being back from Fukuji and Lum and taking classes this summer, this is the first time I have actually felt this dream was attainable. Working as a therapist was something I wanted to do, but honestly up till now it was something I never actually felt I was capable of doing. I continued semester after semester with the growing feeling that I wasn’t good enough, that I wasn’t smart enough. The people at Fukuji and Lum have been great mentors, and the confidence they have shown in me has in turn made me more confident. Since returning from Hawaii I find I have been able to accept the fact that no, I don’t know everything, but that’s ok, that’s what the rest of my education is for.

image7  image3

I am grateful for everything I came away from Hawaii having learnt and seen. In those magical 6 months I made lifelong friends, ate strange and delicious foods (does anyone want to send me some haupia?? no??), collected a hodgepodge of the culture and language, explored, learned much about myself, and fell in love…. with the Islands! So from the bottom of my heart, Mahalo Nui Loa!

By Mark Yanai

More Than Teamwork

20160118_145758

Earlier this year, F&L was fortunate to have five Co-Op students join us from Northeastern University as an education requirement of their physical therapy graduate program. Our relationship with the university is now going on nine years as we’ve hosted more than 20 students for their six-month stay at our clinics. Most of the students are placed at our Windward clinics, but since we had five of them this semester, one lucky Co-op was set to join our newest clinic in Honolulu, the Kuakini Physicians Tower in the Kuakini Medical Center.

When conducting interviews for the Co-Op Program, I look for candidates who will fit in well with our value-based organization. I knew that the student selected for our Honolulu clinic would have to be someone who could handle new and different challenges than previous co-ops. It didn’t take long for me to select Amelia, a fourth year student, to be the one to join our Honolulu team and be a part of the opening of our newest clinic. I was impressed by her maturity and work ethic and knew she would fit right in. It’s not surprising that the name Amelia is derived from the Latin words for “industrious” and “striving” as she fits the bill of what we look for in each of our employees.

Amelia is now back to her studies in Boston, but took the time to be a guest blogger for us and reflect on her experience working at the Honolulu clinic.

Guest Blogger: Amelia and the Meaning of “Team-work”

hon clinic group new 2016

When I initially heard a week before coming to Hawaii that I would be the Co-Op joining the Honolulu clinic, I’ll admit I had a few reservations.  My worries about being the only Co-Op at the clinic and the commute without a car were soon washed away and I couldn’t be more grateful to have been a part of the Kuakini family. As cheesy as it sounds, I never fathomed how inspiring and life-changing my experience at the Honolulu clinic would be. On my first day at Fukuji & Lum, a little silver Pontiac Vibe pulled into my driveway just after noon and drove me to see Lanikai beach. This would be the first of many car rides over the Pali Highway full of conversations with Art Lum, from which I have learned a great deal and truly cherish. During that first car ride Art explained to me the values based-culture of F&L, to which I could do little more than nod my head politely in reply.

[one_half]

IMG_2158

[/one_half]

[one_half_last]However, after reflecting on my experience it is something I more deeply understand and hope to take with me as a clinician for the rest of my life. I’ve heard many peers and friends talk about the great “team” attitude they share with their coworkers and I’ve experienced it myself at other jobs, but there is something really unique about the F & L culture that makes it so special. I’m not quite sure I can put that into words, but I do know that each person I had the pleasure of working with in Honolulu for has influenced who I will become as a clinician and as a person. [/one_half_last]

[one_half]Art, Shaw, Brittany, Mike, Michelle, Lynn, Julie, and Terrence all went out of their way to make me feel at home; from feeding me endless Hawaiian snacks to teaching me new exercises to giving me weekend tips. They were continuously patient, kind, and supportive of me, of one another, and most importantly of our patients. Each of them brought something special to the table and our bond extended beyond the doors of the clinic to weekend hikes, Filipino restaurants, and Karaoke sessions. They showed me just what the F&L culture is all about and I hope to carry that with me wherever I go. [/one_half]

[one_half_last]

IMG_2914

[/one_half_last]

Mauka a Makai

After cruising past Lanikai beach on that first day in Honolulu, Art and I headed over the mountains. He explained to me the first Hawaiian words I learned on the island, mauka and makai, to describe the mountains and the ocean. These words stuck with me and have come to mean a lot to me. Art marveled at how lovely the mountains looked that afternoon, and I can remember admiring that after many years in Hawaii he still found a new appreciation for the beauty of his surroundings every day. The beauty of the island was everywhere in Hawaii, filling my heart with joy day after day.

IMG_3174       IMG_3769

In the 6 months I spent in having some of the most beautiful experiences of my life I came to an understanding that I have taken with me back to Boston. We often think tropical islands are the most beautiful places in the world, yearning for them in daydreams and ending up unsatisfied or unhappy by our own current surroundings. But the simple realization that it is much more about attitude than it is about surroundings has made me more gracious and appreciative, and ultimately more happy. Hawaii has taught me to find beauty and happiness wherever I stand, mauka a makai. Joy can be found under streetlights and in sunsets if I open my eyes to it.

IMG_2092

 

By Mark Yanai

2016 Volunteer Recognition Dinner

20160727_190359_HDR

The Start of the Next Generation

A profession is defined as “a type of job that requires special education, expertise or skill.” When working in the physical therapy profession, it is more than just a job. It is as most therapists say, “their true calling”, with a strong desire to spend the rest of their lives committed to this profession. At F&L, we are so passionate and engrossed in physical therapy, that we feel the need to share our enthusiasm with PT hopefuls to strengthen and promote physical, occupational and massage therapy.

[two_third]

Each year, we accept 20-30 volunteers ranging from high school to college graduate students. The program is overseen by Brad Kaya, P.T., M.S., O.C.S., who coordinates the supervision and scheduling of the applicants. Accepted students of the program will receive first hand experience at one of our four outpatient orthopedic clinics. They are trained as regular staff members and become ambassadors of the organization. Students are encouraged to foster relationships with experienced therapists so that they gain valuable knowledge in preparation for applying into a graduate PT program.

[/two_third]

[one_third_last]

brad

[/one_third_last]

[one_third]

20160727_182352_HDR#1

[/one_third]

[two_third_last]

F&L recognizes the efforts and contributions of our volunteers by hosting a special Volunteer Appreciation Dinner every summer at one of our clinics. This year’s dinner was held at our Kokokahi facility and attended by 17 students. The event included staff speakers who shared their personal journeys about how they got into the PT profession and gave helpful advice to the students interested in applying for PT school. I never tire of listening to my co-workers and their experiences about getting into physical therapy school. We often have a great turnout and I always leave the dinner with admiration for our staff members as they themselves volunteer their time to come and talk to students interested in applying for PT school.

[/two_third_last]

As therapists, we all recall volunteering somewhere to find our calling and remember the day that we realized it was to work in the physical therapy field. It feels rewarding to give back to this profession, knowing we were able to give these volunteers the opportunity to discover their true calling. We look forward to seeing this next generation of therapists in the future, possibly working with us soon.

20160727_191739_HDR

If you have any questions regarding the Volunteer Program, feel free to email me at markyanai@fukujilumpt.com.

By Mark Yanai

The Hi Life of the Supposed

 

20160416_120825

This past semester, Natalia, one of the five Northeastern University Co-ops worked with me at our W.O.R.C. site and with Randy at our Kailua clinic. She was one of the PT students that was exposed to and later immersed in Postural Restoration Institute (PRI) techniques, something exciting and new to F&L. Natalia has since returned to Boston to resume classes and continue her pursuit of her doctorate degree in Physical Therapy.

She spent her last weekend in Hawaii attending F&L’s closed course on PRI, which I wrote about in my last blog. I had just returned from my trip to Boston where I commented to everyone that “no one has heard of any student named Natalia”.  She was then given the name “Supposed” by James Anderson, our course instructor.

I don’t always get to work closely with the Co-Ops as they are assigned to our various clinics, but when I do, I get very attached to them. Natalia was no different and we got to know each other well. She was a terrific student of the craft and I know she’ll become an excellent clinician. We will definitely miss her presence at the clinics and wish her the best in her future endeavors. We are so grateful to Natalia for writing about her experience working with F&L and the fun she had living on the island for six months.

20160217_181554

My Co-Op Experience: Natalia

Upon my return to Boston, I’ve heard the same question over and over from my classmates and friends: “How was Hawaii?” This is a surprisingly difficult question for me. I usually answer with some variation on the words “spectacular”, “completely amazing”, or perhaps a succinct “epic”, but no matter what I say, the words seem lacking to describe how much the experience truly meant to me.

Living in Kailua and working at Fukuji & Lum has without a doubt been the best six months of my life to date. I got to work with such amazing, compassionate, intelligent people who provided me a real life example of what culture- and value-oriented health care is all about. I got to learn from uniquely skilled, experienced, and dedicated physical therapists who were incredibly generous in sharing their knowledge and went out of their way to give me an educational experience I don’t think I could have gotten anywhere else. I got to become familiar with types of treatments not all practitioners learn even after graduation, such as PRI, Strain-Counterstrain, and NAIOMT.

20160622_133039

Over the past six months, I have grown so much and become more confident in myself as an individual, a healthcare professional, and a future physical therapist. And of course, I got to do all this in between weekends spent exploring sheer clifftops, cascading waterfalls, colorful pillboxes, jungle forests, ancient ruins, hidden treehouses, vibrant reefs, and white-sand beaches; eating amazingly ono grinds from all around the island, from the food trucks in Haleiwa to ramen in Honolulu; and visiting unique cultural places like the city graffiti of Kaka’ako or the tranquil beauty of the Byodo-in Temple, among so many others.

Along the way, I got to forge incredible friendships with my coworkers, roommates, patients and more. Living in Hawaii taught me to open up so much more than I ever used to and showed me just how easy it is to make friends, be it with someone I met on the top of the Makapu’u lighthouse hike, in downtown Honolulu, at the beach playing volleyball, or even in the clinic. I’m so grateful that I got to share some pretty awesome island experiences with such a large variety of people. No matter where I was or how much of a stranger I felt at first, I was always welcomed and treated like ohana. From my experience, the “aloha spirit” is very much a real and tangible thing; the islands really bring people together.

One of the things I’m really glad I did was visiting Kauai to take in the views along the steep Na Pali Coast hike and from the top of Waimea Canyon. Each island is so different and offers so many unique experiences, which I didn’t realize until after I had gone to Kauai. I hope to come back to Hawaii and experience more of the adventures each island has to offer. And despite all the hikes and adventures I managed to fit in, there are still things on my Oahu bucket list I have yet to do!

20160604_083831

As I return to classes and adjust back to life in Boston (which, right now, is far hotter and stickier than Hawaii was, unfortunately), I am constantly reminded about how lucky and blessed I was to be surrounded by some of the most beautiful beaches, mountains, bays and waterfalls in the world, all within such close reach. I deeply treasure all of the connections and ongoing relationships I made there, and it’s hard to be so far away; the island life already seems so distant. I think warmly of the patients I helped to treat and the amazing people I worked with, and I’m trying to bring some of that aloha spirit they showed me along with me back to Boston. If I’m being honest, I wish I could still be working at Fukuji & Lum – six months seemed too short! But I know that the rest of my education lies in front of me, and the island will always be there to welcome me back. In the meantime, I’ll have to settle to listening to Kolohe Kai and Jack Johnson while studying for midterms in the library, dreaming of Lanikai beaches.

Mahalo and aloha oe to everyone in Fukuji & Lum and anyone who’s touched my life in Hawaii in someway. I hope to be back to say aloha again some day.

Love,

Natalia

20160618_150717

By Mark Yanai

Introducing Kaitlin

I can’t believe our Co-ops have been with us for two months already and all five of them have been wonderful additions to the F&L Ohana! We would like to introduce our final Co-Op student, Kaitlin, who works primarily at our clinics located at the Kokokahi YWCA in Kaneohe. She has been doing a great job of bouncing back and forth between the Aquatic center, WORC and Kaneohe clinic. She celebrated her birthday last week, so it’s only appropriate that we get to know her a little better and wish her a Hau’oli La Hanau!(HAPPY BIRTHDAY!)

What school did you attend in high school and what’s your current college?
I went to South Carroll High School in Maryland. I currently attend Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts.

What drew you to PT?
When I was younger I wanted to be a teacher, but as I got older I felt a draw to be more involved in the medical field. Physical therapy is a career that involves both teaching and medicine! Once I started looking at physical therapy schools, I knew that it was the right choice for me.

Why did you want to do your coop in Hawaii?
I love to travel and I wanted a change of pace from Boston.

What is the strangest thing you have eaten since arriving?
Natto! I tried it at a Japanese market in town with Mila.
What is on your to do list while here?
I really want to do a bicycle trip around the entire island! I also would love to learn how to surf.

What are your outside interests?
I really enjoy hiking, biking, and being outdoors! I love finding new places and meeting new faces, and any activities that can involve both : )

What kind of therapist do you hope to be?
I really hope that I can incorporate injury prevention programs into my career as a physical therapist. I am very interested in pediatric and geriatric orthopedics and hope to be able to work with both patient demographics.

Who is your greatest influence in your life?
My dad has been a huge influence in my life. He is the reason I hold so much value in being active and healthy. Growing up he always encouraged me to try new things, go new places, and find active ways to have fun. I wouldn’t be on the road to becoming a physical therapist if it weren’t for the experiences I had growing up with him.

 

By Mark Yanai

New Beginnings at Kuakini

Welcome to F&L’s Newest Clinic

[one_half]

F&L recently opened its newest clinic in the Physicians Tower of the Kuakini Medical Center (KMC). After our Honolulu Clinic moved out of the Pali Medical Center a few of years ago, we temporarily shared offices with other businesses at KMC.

Last year, we were fortunate enough to find our own office space in the Physicians Tower and began building the clinic from scratch. Under the direction of owner, Art Lum, and clinic director Shaw Okawara, PT, the clinic was successfully completed in January and began seeing patients on the 18th.

One of Art’s visions for the new Honolulu clinic was to not only provide physical therapy services at this clinic, but to allow it to become a gathering place for the community and its many special programs.

[/one_half]

[one_half_last]

IMG_9541

photo 5

[/one_half_last]

[one_half]

VIDEO0300_0000086748

IMG_9411

[/one_half]

[one_half_last]

In February, the Honolulu clinic was honored to host the grand opening of ALS Association’s Golden West Chapter’s first ALS multidisciplinary clinic in Hawaii.

Previously, it was difficulty for patients with ALS to receive the necessary care for the disease in Hawaii. Patients with ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) experience a progressive loss of the ability to talk, walk, swallow, move and breathe. It is due to the multiple symptoms of the disease, a team of varied medical professionals is needed to treat one person.

The new clinic at KMC will offer such an opportunity for patients by providing physical therapy, occupational therapy, respiratory therapy, nutrition, speech therapy and emotional support. Representing F&L in the group are Art Lum, PT, and Nicole Sato, M.O.T.

[/one_half_last]

Heading this group is Brandon Hirota, MD, of Neurology Associates in Kuakini and Fred Fisher, CEO and Golden West Chapter President. Their work and passion have been a driving force to provide a one-stop clinic that will meet once a month at KMC. F&L is grateful that we can be a part of such a program that will provide a much needed service for the community.

IMAG5957        IMAG5952

For any information regarding the ALS Group of Hawaii, please contact the ALS Association at 1-866-750-2572 or email the at careservices@alsagoldenwest.org

The Honolulu clinic also began another great venture by opening its doors this past Saturday to F&L staff and KMC volunteers for a Tai Chi Chuan class. Classes will be held every Saturday from 11am – 12pm. Details to follow in an upcoming blog.

IMG_9634 IMG_9635

If you are interested in receiving physical therapy services at our new Honolulu clinic, please call us at (808)-521-4922.

By Mark Yanai

Introducing Mila

mila & kait

Introducing Mila!

As we continuing with our introductions of our five new co-ops, we welcome Mila to the F&L family. She and her classmate, Kaitlin, are currently working at our Kokokahi clinics, both at the pool and Kaneohe clinic. Throughout the next six months, we hope that some of our patients get the opportunity to be a part of her experience in Hawaii.

What school did you attend in high school and what’s your current college?
I attended Ashland High School and my current college in Northeastern University in Boston.

[one_half]

hawaiiii

[/one_half]

[one_half_last]

What drew you to physical therapy?
During my freshman year of college I became very active and started running and working out with a grassroots workout group called November Project. As a retired dancer and a pharmacy major I quickly realized that my passion lay in the preventative side of medicine that focused on patient care and had an impact on patients’ lives. After going to physical therapy myself, I realized that a career as a physical therapist would allow me to explore my interest in the human body and make a huge impact on the quality of life of my patients. It is an extremely rewarding, challenging, and fun career that completely matches my active lifestyle.

[/one_half_last]

Why did you want to do your co-op in Hawaii?
F&L offers aquatic therapy, which is something I have always been interested in. They also seem to have a family environment within their company, which is something I have always wanted to experience. And… it’s Hawaii; the real question is why would I ever not want to do my coop in paradise! It is so amazing to have a full day at work and then be able to drive 5 minutes to do a sunset hike overlooking the beach.

[one_half]

What has been your experience like so far?
My experience so far has been absolutely incredible! I can’t believe it has only been a month. I have been hiking, surfing, swimming, eating lots of delicious food, meeting wonderful friends, and getting my tan on.

What’s the strangest thing that you’ve eaten since arriving? Natto…

What is on your to do list while here?
Hike stairway to heaven, sky dive, check out Big Island and Kauai, paraglide, learn more songs on guitar, eat everything, get very tan, and of course learn how to surf!

[/one_half]

[one_half_last]

Eddie

[/one_half_last]

What are your outside interests?
I love to dance, cook, write, sing, read, watch movies, hike, and snowboard.

What kind of therapist do you hope to be?
I would like to be an outpatient orthopedic therapist. I hope to obtain the experience and knowledge to confidently provide each individual patient with the best care and attention to their unique injuries.

[one_half]

hawaii

[/one_half]

[one_half_last]
Who is your greatest influence in your life?
I don’t have a single influence in my life. I am blessed to have been surrounded by loving friends and family who have shaped me into the person I am today. I have had the same best friends since the 6th grade and I am very close to my family. I believe the close relationships I have made so far have been my biggest motivator and have showed me how fun life can be when you’re surrounded by those you love!

[/one_half_last]

 

By Mark Yanai

Introducing Kara

Meet Kara!

Continuing with our introductions of our Co-ops, we are happy to have Kara Dwyer as one of our PT students at our WORC and Aquatic sites. Like most Co-ops, Kara is well traveled and is not new to being immersed in a new culture. Read about her travels and what led her to our organization.
[one_half]
What school did you attend in high school and what’s your current college?
I hail from Woodstock, Illinois, where I walked the halls of Woodstock High School (go Blue Streaks!) and now attend Northeastern University. 

[/one_half]
[one_half_last]

WHSExteriorSoSt_0

[/one_half_last]

What drew you to physical therapy?
I’ve always been interested in the human body, I’ve always been active, and find it incredibly fulfilling to help people. Put all of that in a blender and you get an aspiring PT. Also my mother is a PT so I’ve always been around it. Fun fact- my grandmother was as well, so I’ll be a third generation PT!

Kara Hat

Why did you want to do your co-op in Hawaii?
I have a bit of a travel bug, passed on from parents who met while traveling the world, so at every opportunity I get to experience new people and places, I leap! It helps that Northeastern impresses experiential learning on all its students, and what better way to get experience and learn more about yourself and others than leaving your comfort zone. Fukuji & Lum also seemed like the kind of loving and open environment I would like to learn in.

           admin-ajax       11709626_10206472697753554_3392962553118012365_n

What has been your experience like so far?
So far I’ve learned an incredible amount, as I haven’t been in a physical therapy environment like Fukuji & Lum before. My clinical experience up to now mostly consists of working with children in a vastly different setting. I’ve had a wonderful time exploring Kailua and a little of Kaneohe and Honolulu, and everyone I have met are the most genuinely open and welcoming people. So far I’ve been getting around by bike, albeit a bike that is just a tad too small, but it is quite enjoyable. I’ve started adventuring into the island and ocean, and anticipate a lot more of that!

[one_half]
FullSizeRender-1-225x300

[/one_half]

[one_half_last]
What’s the strangest thing that you’ve eaten since arriving?
We’ve been trying a lot of interesting fruit, like lilikoi, guava, longan. I would say the strangest thing i have been introduced to would be spam musubi, which was quite an experience and pretty good honestly!

What are your outside interests?
Well let’s see now, I have a plethora of interests. At school I’m involved in a few theatre groups, I ref and play intramural sports: mostly volleyball and soccer, I’ve taken a few ASL courses, I’m involved in choir, I like exploring/adventuring, goofing off, and being a kid, although the last year I’ve spent a lot of time with my best friend- the library.

[/one_half_last]

What is on your to do list while here?
We’ve already started a “Hawaii bucket list” that seems to get longer every day- to experience and learn about the melting pot of Hawaiian cultures; explore mountains, waterfalls, and coastal hikes; scuba dive once or twice; skydive possibly; and do something to be more connected and involved in the community, maybe some sort of rec league, music class, or volunteering opportunities to give back. Also it is a goal of mine to start eating fish. I’ve always thought I didn’t like any kind of fish, but I’ve been trying to expand my horizons in terms of food and it’s going well!
10896988_10206390086130104_3578209961204676773_n

What kind of therapist do you hope to be?
I have yet to experience many of the environments and types of physical therapy there are, so I’m not sure yet how I see myself as a therapist. I do, however, hope to be able to instill confidence and joy in my patients as they work towards their goals.

Who is your greatest influence in your life?
I have so many very interesting, amazing, positive, eclectic, joyful, intelligent, open, serious, curious, loyal, driven, caring, and wonderful individuals in my life, from whom I try to emulate these certain characteristics. So I couldn’t really pick out one person who has been influential to me in a large way, but give each of them credit for part of who I am today.

Screen-Shot-2016-01-09-at-9.58.07-PM-300x169